Atlanta Speeding Ticket Attorney

Fighting for Your Rights and Freedom

Did you receive a speeding ticket in Atlanta? This can lead to increased insurance costs, as well as potential driver's license suspension if you accumulate enough points on your driving record - in addition to the fine associated with the citation itself. By consulting Atlanta speeding ticket attorney Matthew T. McNally about your ticket, you can find out what options you have in challenging this and thus potentially avoiding the negative consequence of simply paying a ticket and moving on.

In Georgia, a speeding ticket may result in the assessment of up to 6 points on your driving record, depending upon how fast you were going versus the designated speed limit in the area. Following is a basic list of what point values may be assessed for different violations:

  • 15 to 18 mph over the posted limit - 2 points
  • 19 to 23 mph - 3 points
  • 24 to 33 mph - 4 points
  • 34+ mph - 6 points

If you accumulate 15 points on your driving record, the Georgia Department of Drivers' Services may suspend your driver's license.

Speeding Tickets and Increased Insurance Costs

It is important to note that the potential points that may be assessed to your record may not directly affect your insurance rates. Rather, the insurance company would look at the particular offenses that appear on your record, not necessarily the point value associated with these. Your insurance company may raise your premium in conjunction with a poor driving record - at times for up to 3 years or even 7 years. This can cost you hundreds or even thousands of dollars through the years.

Consult an Atlanta Speeding Ticket Lawyer

For a free consultation regarding your Atlanta speeding ticket, contact the Law Office of Matthew T. McNally today!

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